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# /r/Peloton Pre-TDF Survey 2020

Gentlemen, Ladies and those otherwise addressed - we know you've been waiting for a good thing, and the survey results are finally ready!
The answers were collected from you all during August 2020 with 1428 unique replies. That's a participation of 0.5% of all subscribers! That's really not too bad, when you keep in mind how popular these kind of surveys are. But we here at /peloton want to show you that this is all about presenting the information in the subreddit to cater better to our audience!
Updated after a few hours to include some more historical data the final edit that for some reason wasn't copied properly
Year 2013 2014 2015 2016 2018 Mar 2018 Aug 2019 2020
Results 2013-06-12 2014-06-25 2015-08-07 2016-11-17 2018-03-06 2018-08-20 2019-07-22 2020-10-12
Replies 351 598 1395 892 630 928 986 1428
Without further ado, let's get cracking on the response

You and Cycling

1. Where do you live?

Country 2015 2016 2018 Mar 2018 Aug 2019 2020
USA 32% 28.3% 22.84% 25.32% 20.23% 24.59%
UK 18.6% 17.6% 14.70% 20.13% 15.48% 14.80%
Netherlands 6.4% 9.4% 11.50% 11.58% 10.01% 11.01%
Germany 3.73% 3.4% 4.95% 6.39% 7.84% 6.65%
Denmark 3.9% 3.6% 4.31% 3.79% 7.64% 5.79%
Belgium 3.8% 2.7% 8.15% 3.57% 5.78% 5.36%
France 2.01% 1.08% 2.88% 2.27% 5.26% 3.50%
Canada 4.9% 7% 6.39% 4.22% 4.95% 4.50%
Australia 5.2% 4.7% 3.83% 4.00% 4.33% 3.93%
Slovenia 0.73% 0.32% 1.30% 1.14% 2.14%
Norway 2.58% 1.8% 1.60% 1.95% 2.58% 1.86%
Sweden 1.08% 1.09% 1.44% 1.41% 1.75% 1.43%
Ireland 1.00% 1.09% 1.44% 1.19% 0.72% 1.36%
Portugal 1.65% 1.8% 2.40% 1.52% 1.34% 1.14%
Italy 1.45% 1.44% 0.65% 1.03% 1.07%
Largely the same picture as ever, with the US leading the way, the UK in second and then a sliding scale of Europeans countries. Slovenia continues to pick its way up the pile for obvious reasons!
World Map to demonstrate

2. What's your age?

u17 17-19 20-25 26-30 31-35 36-40 41-50 51+ Total
2015 2.22% 12.04% 41.51% 24.66% 10.68% 4.87% 2.94% 1.08% 1395
2016 1.5% 8.9% 40.8% 24% 12% 5.4% 5.2% 2% 887
2018 Mar 1% 7.1% 33.5% 27.4% 16.2% 7% 5.7% 2.1% 617
2018 Aug 1.7% 9% 33.9% 26.4% 15.5% 7% 5% 1.5% 905
2019 1.5% 6.6% 33.2% 27.5% 16.4% 7.1% 5.8% 2% 972
2020 1.3% 6.8% 31.7% 28% 16.6% 7.2% 5% 2.5% 1420
Pretty much the same as last year, with the usual reddit demographics of majority 20 somethings dominating.

3. What's your gender?

'13 '14 '15 '16 '18 (1) '18 (2) '19 '20
Male 97.2% 97% 94.9% 93.4% 93.3% 93.6% 95.1% 94.9%
Female 2.8% 2.7% 4.8% 5.3% 5.3% 5.4% 3.7% 4.8%
Other - 0.33% 0.29% 0.78% 0.76% - -
Non-Binary - - - - 0.64% 0.99% 1.2% 0.4%
More normality here for reddit.

4. How much of the men's season do you watch/follow?

Type March '18 (%) August '18 (%) 2019 (%) 2020 (%)
Grand Tours 84.7 92.0 90.2 87.3
Monuments 79.1 74.9 79 75.9
WT Stage races 67.4 62.4 70.5 71.7
WT One day races 73.3 59.8 62.3 60.7
Non WT Stage races 32.6 16.7 17.4 25
Non WT One day races 34.8 13.7 17.4 20.7
Literally everything I can consume 35.9 18.1 21.1 27.1
Whilst GT following may be down (somehow), all the lower level stuff is up, which makes sense considering how desperate we have been for any racing during the season shutdown.

5. Do you maintain an interest in women's professional road racing?

Do you maintain an interest in women's professional road racing? '19 '20
Yes 49.8 49.2
No 50.2 50.8
Still very much a half/half interest in women's cycling on the subreddit.

6. How much of the women's season do you follow?

The following is true for the half of you that follows womens cycling.
How Much %
Just the biggest televised events 63.15%
Most of the live televised/delayed coverage stuff 29.08%
All televised racing 5.09%
Down to .Pro & beyond 2.69%

7. How long have you been watching cycling?

How Long %
Under a year 2,95%
1-3 years 19,50%
4-6 years 19,85%
7-9 years 14,10%
10-12 years 13,81%
13-15 years 7,15%
15-20 years 10,73%
20-25 years 6,17%
25 years + 5,75%
Simplified the years a little this time, but whilst we have a fair number of newbies, most people have picked the sport up since around 2013/14.

Sporting Favourites

8. Do you have like/dislike feelings about WT teams?

Once more, 14.4% of people really don't have feelings on the subject.
Of those that do:
AG2R Astana Bahrain Bora CCC Cofidis Quick-Step EF FDJ
Like 352 213 127 770 156 116 847 724 423
Meh 775 620 773 415 889 896 310 448 700
Dislike 52 356 263 31 112 141 71 37 53
Karma 300 -143 -70 739 44 -25 776 677 370
Israel Lotto Michelton Movistar NTT Ineos Jumbo Sunweb Trek UAE
Like 135 364 517 231 101 304 925 279 383 118
Meh 740 764 626 646 931 414 282 805 765 734
Dislike 302 40 52 326 121 562 53 97 42 331
Karma -167 324 465 -95 -20 -258 872 182 341 -213
So, the most popular team this year is Jumbo-Visma, followed by Quick-Step & Bora-hansgrohe. Least popular are Ineos & UAE.
As per usual, no one cares about NTT & CCC, with nearly 81% of users rating NTT as meh. Pretty damning stuff.
Lastly, we have the usual historical comparison of how teams have fared over time, normalised to respondents to that question on the survey.
Things to note then, firstly that the Astana redemption arc is over, seeing them back in the negative, maybe Fulgsangs spring issues helped aid that? The petrodollar teams of UAE & Bahrain are stubbornly negative too, with Israel keeping up the Katusha negative streak. Meanwhile, at the top end, EF & Jumbo go from strength to strength, whilst some others like Sunweb are sliding over time - their transfer policies no doubt helping that.

10. Do you ride a bike regularly?

Answer 2018Mar 2018Aug 2019 2020
For fun 61.5% 63.4% 59.9% 62.9%
For fitness 59.3% 59.6% 54.8% 59.8%
For commuting 46% 46% 45.6% 40%
For racing 20.6% 20.6% 15.9% 17.7%
No, I don't 14.2% 12.9% 14.8% 13.6%
Still a fairly small group of racers out of all of us

11. Out of the sports you practice, is cycling your favourite?

Yes No
58,29% 41,71%
A new addition to the survey prompted by a good point last time, just over half of us rate cycling as the favourite sport we actually do.

12. What other sports do you follow?

Sport #
Association Football / Soccer 50.78%
Formula 1 35.81%
American Football 26.27%
Basketball 22.46%
Track & Field 17.58%
Esports (yes, this includes DotA) 17.30%
Rugby 14.27%
Skiing 14.12%
Ice Hockey 13.63%
Baseball 12.15%
Motorsports (Not including F1) 10.59%
Cricket 10.52%
Tennis 9.53%
Chess 8.97%
Triathlon 8.69%
Biathlon 8.12%
Snooker 7.06%
Golf 6.92%
Swimming 6.85%
Ski Jumping 6.78%
Climbing 5.72%
Martial Arts 5.65%
Handball 5.44%
Darts 5.01%
Speed Skating 5.01%
Football always tops the charts, and Formula 1 continues to rank extremely highly among our userbase. Those who have a little following below 5% include Sailing, Fencing, Surfing, Boxing & Ultra-Running.
Other cycling disciplines
Sport #
Cyclocross 22.10%
Track Cycling 14.34%
MTB 8.97%
BMX 1.20%

13. Out of the sports you follow, is cycling your favourite sport?

Yes No
61.79% 38,21%
Good. Makes sense if you hang out here.

Subreddit stats

14. How often do you participate in a /Peloton Race Thread whilst watching a race?

2015 2016 2018Mar 2018Aug 2019 2020
I always participate in Race Threads during races 2.8% 2% 2.2% 4% 2.5% 3%
I follow Race Threads during races 41.7% 36.7% 38.1% 42.1% 42.5% 38.9%
I often participate in Race Threads during races 16.8% 19% 16.5% 18.9% 15.2% 13%
I rarely/never participate in Race Threads during races 38.7% 41.3% 43.1% 35% 39.8% 45.1%
Slightly less invested than before, reverting back to an older trade.

15. How do you watch Races?

Method 2018Mar 2018Aug 2019 2020
Pirate Streams 62% 46.5% 50.2% 47.9%
Free Local TV 55.7% 64.5% 59.6% 53.9%
Desperately scrabbling for Youtube highlights 37.9% 30.2% 28.2% 24.9%
Paid Streaming services 32.3% 35.4% 38.3% 46.3%
Year on year, paid streaming services go up - the increasing availability of live content legally continues to improve, and so do the numbers on the survey.

16. Where else do you follow races live (in addition to watching them)?

Type 2018Mar 2018Aug 2019 2020
/Peloton race threads 86.2% 83.4% 80.2% 76.9%
Twitter 30.5% 34.7% 33.3% 38.3%
PCS Liveticker - - 30.2% 32%
Official tracker (if available) 24%
The Cyclingnews liveticker 26% 23.5% 21.5% 18.9%
Sporza (site/ticker) 1.89% 9.5% 10.8% 10.8%
NOS Liveblog - 6.8% 7% 9.2%
Steephill 0.52% 13.5% 10.2% 8.2%
/Peloton discord 6.5% 5.4% 7.5% 7.2%
Other cycling forums 15.1% 8.1% 7.6% 7%
feltet.dk - 2.2% 5.4% 5.2%
Facebook 3.8% 5.4% 4% 4.2%
BBC Ticker - 3.5% 2.1% 4.1%
DirectVelo - 1.3% 1.6% 1.8%
Non Cycling Forums - 1.3% 1.2% 1.2%
/cyc/ - 1.3% 1% 0.6%
/peloton IRC ~0 0.8% 0.4% 0.5%
The PCS liveticker continues to have a strong following, whilst the cyclingnews ticker slowly slides into less usage over time.

17. Do you use /Peloton mostly in classic reddit or redesign when on the desktop?

Type 2018 Aug 2019 2020
Classic 75.1% 67.2% 46.2%
Redesign 24.9% 32.8% 53.8%
Time to abandon ship. The end has come.

18. With what version of reddit do you browse the sub?

Version 2019 2020
Official App 17.9 31.1
Desktop Classic 37.8 25.8
3rd Party App 18.3 17.2
Mobile Web 12.4 14.7
Desktop Redesign 13.7 11.2
Phone browsing is very much in vogue.

19. How did you find the sub?

How %
Through other forms of reddit, f.e. /bicycling 48.33%
Too long - can't remember 38.65%
Google search 9,11%
My friend told me 2,28%
I wanted to talk about my exercise bike 0.78%
Twitter 0.5%
Lantern Rouge Youtube 0.28%

Other bits and bobs

20. Did you think back in March we would see any more racing this year?

Yes No
52,81% 47,19%
Despite the threat, we have seen racing again

21. Will we manage to fulfill the rest of the UCI calendar without further Covid-19 issues postponing more races?

Yes No
25.3% 74.7%
Sorry to you 25%, Amstel, Roubaix & a bunch of other races have falled foul of COVID-19 related cancellations.

22. When did you become aware of Alexander Foliforov?

When %
Before the 2016 Giro 3,25%
22nd May, 2016 15,55%
On /pelotonmemes in 2020 21,13%
Who? 60,07%
If you didn't know of the man, watching him demolish the Giro field in 2016 on the stage 15 ITT should help to gain understanding

23. Who will win the 2020 Tour de France?

Rider %
Roglic 52,12%
Bernal 16,57%
Pinot 9,24%
Dumoulin 7,9%
N.Quintana 2,82%
Pogacar 1,41%
Richie Porte 0,35%
We can safely say that most of us were wrong about this one.
That's not a lot of confidence in Richie Porte either, the man who was to finish on the third spot of the podium. Alexander Foliforov (0,23%) had just a tiny number of votes less, and that man wasn't even in the race.

24. What for you was the defining cycling moment of the previous decade?

We had a lot of brilliant suggestions, but these were the clear five favourites when we tabulated the results.
Honorable mentions go to the Giro 2018, which had Tom Dumoulin winning, and of almost identical fascination to many of you - Tom Dumoulin going on someones porta-potty in the middle of the stage.
Little bit of recency bias perhaps, but that's better than ignoring that this was for the last decade and firmly insisting Tom Boonens 2005 WC win was the biggest thing. Special shoutout to almost all the Danes present in /peloton who voted for Mads Pedersens WC win last year. It's an understandable reaction.

25. Any suggestions for the Survey?

New Questions
We promise to feature one of these suggestions in the next survey
Suggestions
We will try to implement this. But it will also skew results.
About the Survey
The subscribers are torn on Women's cycling, nearly a 50/50 split there as the survey showed - The moderators at /peloton are firmly in the "more cycling is better" basket, and we will continue to get as good coverage of womens cycling as possible.
Are you trying to give the moderators PTSD? Because this is how you give the moderators PTSD.

26. Any suggestions for the sub?

ALSJFLKAJSLDKJAØLSJKD:M:CSAM)=#/()=#=/")¤=/)! - Your moderator seems to be out of function. Please stand by while we find you a new moderator
The Weekly threads are great for these types of questions, where several people can contribute and build up once it is understood which information is relevant.
Our experience is that "limited" will never be so, if we're going to moderate it fairly. Moderating is not a popularity contest, but believe it or not, we're actually trying to be as fair as possible. and for that, we need rules that are not subjective. Unless you have a stationary exercise bike.
All of these are good suggestions, but remember that all of you can also contribute - The mods are sometimes stretched thin, specially in the middle of hectic race schedules. It's easier if one of you has a way to contact a rider or a person of interest and can facilitate the initial communication.
We've worked on this! The Official Standard is now as follows: [Race Thread] 202x Race Name – Stage X (Class)
This sounds as a nice community project for the after-season, and hopefully many of you subscribers can contribute.
Come with suggestions on how to tidy it up!
We have chastised all the mods. They are now perfectly trained in gender-neutral pronouns. Be well, fellow being.
If we can implement this for hard liquor, you know we will.
The spoiler rule is one that is discussed frequently - in general - some users absolutely hate it, but a majority love it. Perhaps we'll include a question in the next survey to see how this divide is exactly.
We actually do - whenever there is a matter of life or death, we think public information is more important than a spoiler rule. But at the same time, we try to collect all the different posts into one main thread, so to keep things focused and letting very speculative posts meet with hard evidence from other sources.
This is a tough ask of the internet. While we can agree that voting should be done accordingly to what insights they bring, not subjective opinions, it is very hard to turn that type of thinking around. We can ask of you, our subscribers, that you please think twice about hitting that downvote button, and only do so because of you think a post is factually incorrect, not because it differs with your own subjective opinion.
That's the primary analysis of the survey! Feel free to contribute with how you experience things here!
submitted by PelotonMod to peloton [link] [comments]

CMV: Proportional Representation (PR) is the Superior System

It is more fair

I was inspired by the American elections on this one. That's because hearing Trump complain about election fraud seems rich considering he would not have come close to beating Hilary or Biden in the last two elections without the Electoral College system (in both instances he lost the popular vote).
Of course, the Electoral College system is law, so gerrymandering cannot legally be "fraud" but come on - if a candidate wins the popular vote they should, morally speaking, win the presidency. The Electoral College system is even worse than British First Past the Post (FPTP) it seems, as a party that wins the Electoral Colleges still does not necessarily have control over the senate.

It reflects the voting majority better

Here in UK recently we had an election where the Prime Minister won an 80 seat majority the size of which he would never have gotten with proportional representation. While Johnson would have always stayed on as PM, he would not have had a "democratic" mandate to push through the policies he wants to: a hard Brexit, Americanising the Supreme Court, questionable Civil Service reforms (Cummings) and the Internal Markets Bill to name a few. That's because a stronger Opposition under PR would have opposed a lot of this.

You get more local representatives that may reflect your point of view

I have heard it said that FPTP returns you a constituent politician that can dedicate themselves to representing local issues. But with PR there may be several local representatives in population dense areas that reflect different political perspectives. So if you have an issue you think a socialist would understand better you can contact them, or if it was a conservative or a liberal you wanted to talk to, you'd be more likely to have those options as well.
Obviously in some communities, you might find there wasn't as broad an array of representatives. However you'd have a better shot at that under PR as well as a wider choice of representatives to talk to even if they are from the same party.

It is just as "stable", if not more so

First, I disagree with the premise that opponents to PR subscribe to that a constitution is stable if it does not require a coalition government and government can more easily enact policies in accordance with their voting base (and get those through parliament). Firstly, "more stuff done" is not better: quality, not quantity.
When we had a minority conservative government before 2019 I actually thought parliament were doing a good job of scrutinising and making amendments to Brexit legislation so that the country could come to a positive consensus on what would be a stable result. Being able to rush stuff through parliament just leads to chaotic mistakes like the Iraq war, where Blair was able to rush a decision to go to war even though the decision was very popular among the public at large.
Would he have been able to do this under a proportionally representative parliament? Also would Cummings have as much sway in bullying his vision for the country if parliament was proportionally representative? Neither of these seem likely. The other objection related to the point about is that FPTP means the largest group can get their voice heard whereas with a coalition government the negotiations result in a compromise that represent no particular group.
But actually PR just treats what the majority want a lot differently. For example if 40% of people want a No Deal Brexit but 60% of people are divided between Remain and Soft Brexit, sure the largest minority group wants a hard break from the EU. But it would seem that the majority of people (60%) would prefer to at least remain in a customs union with Europe. So FPTP has a twisted idea of what it means to represent the majority.
The idea that it would be less stable and more democratic to force a vision through parliament that most people don't want because ideology exists as a spectrum rather than a binary categorisation seems perverse. If a National Unity Government was strong enough - necessary in fact - to face Hitler, it seems that coalition governments should be able to fare well enough during times of lesser crisis.

It won't particularly lead to racist parties forming, or it might but it is not that substantial

So, with the vote split between two large parties partially "left" or "right to the Overton window people will generally vote for centrist governments, or centre-right if you consider UK and America are to the right of most other countries. This doesn't really give much breathing space for racist parties in general as racist parties tend to have radical ideologies that deviate far from the centre-ground.
But with proportional representation, people no longer consider voting for a party that deviates too far from centre a "wasted vote" since those parties now have a legitimate shot to either get into power, or simply to veto government. Whereas before, they would be stealing votes from a mainstream party closest too them, enabling the party you hate most to get in, now that doesn't matter because your favourite party can form a coalition with the enemy of your friend (whether in power or opposition).
Or they can form a coalition with your enemy, softening the blows and impacts of that party's policy making. This can lead to authoritarian and racist parties forming, some say. But the thing is firstly, racist parties can get in power even with FPTP.
For example, when the Reformed National Party won most of the seats in the 1948 FPTP election leading to apartheid South Africa (1). The Nazi Party had actually arrested all of the Communist deputies and changed the rules to make it easier to pass the Enabling Act in 1933 (1), thus making the system less proportionally representative.
Meanwhile, Karl Popper has this to say about tolerating (or not tolerating) intolerance in modern democracies:
Unlimited tolerance must lead to the disappearance of tolerance. If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them.
More relevantly to my argument, he says:
as long as we can counter them by rational argument and keep them in check by public opinion, suppression would certainly be unwise.
I extend an interpretation of this (my words, not Popper's) to mean that it could be prudent, even on a political level to occasionally hand the racists a platform so that we can debate and repudiate their ideas. Whereas complete suppression can occasionally lend credence to the idea that a person's logic is "irrefutable" and that is why their expression has been muted. Letting the racist party's a small portion of politic representation to refute their ideas can quash such a notion.
And besides, we can defeat racist parties through legal mechanisms to defeat or obstruct them when their policies become too extreme. For example, the British National Party (BNP) "gained all the borough council seats in parts of Burnley despite getting nowhere near a majority of the vote" (1).
However, the BNP were also obstructed by legal democratic mechanisms when a court ruled the party was legally required to allow ethnic minorities membership in the party, thus morphing the whole focus. Popper sort of makes a similar argument to this as well though neither of us have outright claimed racist or anti-democratic authoritarian parties should be banned entirely:
[W]e should claim the right to suppress [those who are intolerant] if necessary even by force; for it may easily turn out that they are not prepared to meet us on the level of rational argument, but begin by denouncing all argument; they may forbid their followers to listen to rational argument, because it is deceptive, and teach them to answer arguments by the use of their fists or pistols. We should therefore claim, in the name of tolerance, the right not to tolerate the intolerant. We should claim that any movement preaching intolerance places itself outside the law, and we should consider incitement to intolerance and persecution as criminal, in the same way as we should consider incitement to murder, or to kidnapping, or to the revival of the slave trade, as criminal.
I'm not saying that there is no threat from racist parties under PR as quite a few European proportionally representative democracies have them. I am just saying that the threat is firstly exaggerated and secondly we are not exactly protected from them by FPTP either. Could you imagine how bad it would be if a country were facing the same instability, economic depression and racial divisions as a country like Germany during the Weimar Republic but instead of a PR democracy, a racist anti-democratic government were able to gerrymander constituencies to their benefit through FPTP? (1)
___________________________________________

Resources

(1) Electoral Reform Website: "Did Proportional Representation put the Nazis in power?"
submitted by data_rights to changemyview [link] [comments]

FtMtNBtF? Please help so confused!

Hi. I am a (almost) 23 year old AFAB person. When I was 13 I started developing very strong feelings of gender dysphoria and wanted to become male. I came out as trans and socially transitioned until I was 18, then I started taking testosterone.
After about 3 years on T, I met someone who tried to convince me I wasn't trans. Yes, he was abusive and the relationship was toxic but I didn't realise this until another 2.5 years later. He "trained" me into being comfortable with my female body and made me wear lingerie and bikinis. Eventually, I even stopped taking T. I still didn't identify as a woman, but I stopped feeling so strongly that I was a man either and started to identify as non-binary.
I broke up with this guy, as he clearly didn't respect my identity, but I haven't stopped presenting in a feminine way and I've grown increasingly comfortable with it. I've still kept the non-binary label, but I'm presenting as a man less and less and presenting like a woman more and more. And it's so confusing!
I feel like I don't know who I am anymore. I felt so strongly that I was a man and I was so sure I was a man. I had all of the typical signs of gender dysphoria that a transman has. But now I don't know if I am a transman anymore. And you might be thinking "well, if you're okay with being a girl now then just do it, what's the big deal?" but the thing is I don't know how much of that is really coming from me or if it's because of my abusive ex's brainwashing.
This is so bewildering and confusing and frustrating because I just have no idea what gender I am at this point. It's as if I've gone backwards rather than things becoming clearer with time and I have no idea what to do. I've already legally changed my gender to Male so it says M on my passport and I would prefer if it said X, but that isn't an option for me as I live in the UK and non-binary identities are not recognised as legally valid here. And even if they were, what if I want to go back to F again later on? I hate feeling so uncertain like this.
submitted by rambunctiousvejtubbl to gender [link] [comments]

UK’s highest court to hear landmark case on gender-neutral passports after decades-long fight by non-gendered activist

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 66%. (I'm a bot)
The UK Supreme Court is to hear an appeal case on the government's refusal to issue gender-neutral passports brought forward by Christie Elan-Cane.
The non-gendered activist, who has campaigned for a third gender option on British passports for more than 25 years, lost the latest round of per long-running legal challenge at the Court of Appeal in March.
Elan-Cane's law firm, Clifford Chance, said Thursday that it has secured permission to appeal to the Supreme Court to challenge the government's policy to refuse to issue non-gendered passports.
Clifford Chance is proud to be working with Christie Elan-Cane and Blackstone Chambers to argue this case before the Supreme Court.
Per latest case, against the Home Office, was heard at the Court of Appeal in December 2019, after Elan-Cane lost against the Home Office at the High Court in 2018.
Elan-Cane lost per appeal at the Court of Appeal earlier this year, with the court saying that the Home Office policy of only providing binary gender options for UK passports is not unlawful.
Summary Source | FAQ | Feedback | Top keywords: Court#1 passport#2 gender#3 Elan-Cane#4 appeal#5
Post found in /worldnews and /AmalaNetwork.
NOTICE: This thread is for discussing the submission topic. Please do not discuss the concept of the autotldr bot here.
submitted by autotldr to autotldr [link] [comments]

Binary Options Recovery: Scammed Traders, Fake Brokers, and Funds Recovery

Binary Options Recovery: Scammed Traders, Fake Brokers, and Funds Recovery
Following the “permanent temporary” measures against binary options and CFDs (contract for difference), the body in charge implements its own set of limitations that simply forbids regulated houses to offer such product in the UK, hence increasing the risk of pushing retails traders towards illegal brokers and outright scams. Fortunately, a new solution is now available to UK traders via a new United Kingdom Financial regulatory ruling.
More scrutiny from UK banks about financial transactions, even to binary optionsIn short, banks will have to take more responsibility about the financial transactions they facilitate. This new ruling should lead to the creation of a new code of conduct that will help defrauded people to have their funds recovered by their bank, unless it is proven they acted recklessly.
As a popular Financial blog puts, it, “It is likely that should a bank or credit card company be either impersonated by a fraudster in order to gain money, or trick a client into depositing, and the bank allows the transfer, a client will be able to take recourse.
The broad protection should kick for many online scheme and scams, whether it is fake investment companies, fraudulent binary options brokers or those scammers who promise to help you recover your stolen funds…only to steal from you once again. On the other hands, it means the banks will be more likely to forbid transactions to legit businesses, such as reputable cryptocurrency exchanges or honest smart options platforms.
The regulating bodies and financial institutions are taking a number of measures to prevent financial fraud. Binary options trading, in particular, is being controlled with a greater degree of robustness to protect the unwary general public being drawn into a situation where they suffer financial losses. Many hundreds of people around the world are targeted each day.
![img](prwn4ha2ecf51 " ")
Frequently they are novice investors who are unfamiliar with the markets and do not recognize that the so-called trading platform and its way of working are actually bogus. The individual only realizes the extent of the fraud when eventually when the fraudsters finally decide that there is no more money to be had and shut down the account and promptly vanish without trace.
Spotting Fraudulent Binary Options Broker
Some lawyers in the financial fraud division are very familiar with the pattern of behaviour demonstrated by the fraudulent brokers and the distress caused by their dealings with inexperienced investors. There is a track of record of recovery in relation to financial fraud and has a number of strategies and tactics to compel the fraudulent broker or associated financial service providers to restore funds to those who have been deceived.
Needless to say, the fraudsters are accomplished at hiding their tracks and frequently there are myriad inter-connected limited liability companies, often some are registered in different countries, with some dormant and some active. It is hardly surprising if the complexity of the situation results in a failure to discover a single person who can be challenged and held accountable.
However, there are various channels financial fraud lawyers use when attempting to retrieve money for clients and each avenue is investigated. Whilst an individual may be alarmed and confused at the prospect of navigating through the complex structures that have been deliberately set up to confuse, Financial fraud lawyers are usually quite familiar with strategies fraudsters use, and frequently can steer a course to the recovery of some or all of the lost money.
https://preview.redd.it/daa505b3ecf51.jpg?width=600&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=b27aa7697b0bf1afbd238964166ce40c693db2e3
The step of last resort, legal action, is understandably daunting for a person who often has lost significant amounts of money to the fraudulent brokers. It is fully understandable that such a situation will leave the victim decidedly risk-averse. There have been experiences with class actions against the fraudulent brokers and has developed links with litigation funding organizations in order to offset the risk in respect of class actions.
The lessons that can be drawn from the experiences of those individuals who have had the misfortune of losing their investments to fraudsters are to be extremely cautious. Always consider every offer or investment for at least 48 hours before making a decision, a genuine broker will understand the caution that a new investor will view a proposition.
All investments carry a risk and anything that promises a return on your initial investment seems to be significantly higher than normal it is almost certainly not to be trusted. Do not allow yourself to be hurried into a decision, it is highly unlikely that an authentic broker would try to rush you into an investment, especially if you demonstrated reluctance; their reputation would suffer by such behaviour.
You can now recover all money lost to bitcoin, binary options, cryptocurrency, investment, scam by hiring any one of these Verified Wealth Recovery Experts.
To recover money lost to binary options, forex, bitcoins, cryptocurrency, and investment, get all the information you need here; https://bitcoinbinaryoptionsreview.com/binary-options-uk-scammed-traders-fake-brokers-and-funds-recovery/
submitted by sinenyoku to u/sinenyoku [link] [comments]

B1048 - Gender Recognition (Reform) Bill - Division

Gender Recognition (Reform) Bill

A
Bill
To
Reform the grounds and procedure in order to obtain gender recognition; and for connected purposes
BE IT ENACTED by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-
1 - Definitions:
The “2004 Act” refers to the Gender Recognition Act 2004.
The “2015 Acts” refers to the Gender Equality Act 2015 and the Gender Equality Enhancement Act 2015
2 - Amendments to the 2004 Act
(1)The following provisions of the 2004 Act are repealed—
(5) Where gender markings are required to denote gender identity in all official documentation including but not limited to Passports, Driving Licenses and correspondence from Government Departments, a non binary person shall be afforded the option to denote their legal gender identity an ‘x’, or as ‘non-binary’
and consequently the definitions of “Gender Dysphoria” and “approved country or territory” under Section 25 are repealed
(2) The following sections in the 2004 Act are amended—
and subsequently add “identity” after “acquired gender” in Section 10 (5) and Section 25
(2) “Protected Information” means information that relates to a person: (a) who has made an application for a gender recognition certificate and which concerns that application or any other application by that person under this Act. (b) whose gender identity, or lack thereof, has become the acquired gender identity and concerns the gender identity before it became the acquired gender identity.
(3) Insert a new section into the 2004 Act, reading:
2A - Applications to the Registrar General Schedule 3A (Applications to the Registrar General) has effect .
And Schedule 3A shall be implemented as per the schedule of this Act.
3 - Amendments to the 2015 Acts
Section 2 in the Gender Equality Act 2015 is repealed in its entirety, and consequently Section 2 of the Gender Equality Enhancement Act 2015 is repealed.
4 - Amendments to the Equality Act 2010
In Section 27 of Schedule 3, replace—
And insert subsection (9) reading, “A person using a service should be under no obligation to disclose their gender identity or be excluded from using a service based on their perceived gender identity, or lack thereof”
And insert subsection (a) after (9) reading, “any exclusion based on perceived gender identity, or lack thereof, or based on a person’s gender which has ceased to be the same as their acquired gender, shall be treated as discrimination based on gender identity.”
And rename the cross heading “Single Sex Spaces” to “Same Gender Identity Spaces”
5 - Extent, Commencement and Short Title
(1)This Section and Section 4 extends to England and Wales, and Scotland
(2) Section 1, Section 2, Section 3 and consequently the Schedule of this Act extends to England and Wales only.
(3)This Act comes into force 6 months after Royal Assent.
(4) This Act may be cited as the Gender Recognition (Reform) Act 2020.
#Schedule
Insert in the 2004 Act:
Schedule 3A - Applications to the Registrar General
1 - Interpretations
In this section, “Registrar General” shall refer to the Registrar General for England & Wales.
2 - Persons who may apply to the Registrar General for Gender Recognition
(1)A person making an application under Section 1 (1) of this Act may do so if they meet the condition that:
(a) is a subject of a UK birth registry entry or; (b) is not the subject of such an entry, but is an ordinary resident in England or Wales.
3 - Notice to be given by Registrar General upon receipt of application
(1)On receipt of an application under Section 1 (1) of this Act, the Registrar General must notify the applicant in writing, including electronic form: —
(a) that the application has been received (b) the date by which a Gender Recognition Certificate will be provided. (c)that the applicant has the right to revoke the Gender Recognition Certificate during the intermission period and is not limited to applying for a Gender Recognition Certificate again after this period. (d)reiterate that there is no cost for applying for a Gender Recognition Certificate in this instance or in future instances of application.
4 - Ground for which application is granted
(1)The Registrar General must grant application under section 1 (1) of this Act if—
(a) the application includes a statutory declaration by the applicant that the applicant meets the criteria of: (i) Section 1 of this Act (ii) Section 2 of this Schedule
(2) A statutory declaration shall be the only requirement by the Registrar General to process an application for a Gender Recognition Certificate
(a) An applicant may declare they intend to live in their acquired gender permanently but the absence of this must have no bearing on the processing of a Gender Recognition Certificate. (b) there shall be no charge for requesting a Gender Recognition Certificate at any instance of any application by an applicant.
(3)An application for a Gender Recognition Certificate is considered revoked if the applicant sends written notice stating their wish for the application to not continue before the day that a Gender Recognition Certificate is issued
5 - Certificate to be issued by the Registrar General
(1)The Registrar General must issue a Full Gender Recognition Certificate to an applicant by the date given under Section 3 (1) of this Schedule.
(2) If there is a delay in the issuing of the Gender Recognition Certificate, the Registrar General must inform the applicant, in writing, the reasons for such a delay.
(3) If there is an error in print, an applicant may, in writing, inform the Registrar General.
(a) The Registrar General must inform the applicant when the error will be fixed by, and issue a replacement Gender Recognition Certificate.
6 - Gender Recognition obtained outside of England & Wales
(1)When a person has obtained a Gender Recognition Certificate in Scotland or Northern Ireland, —
(a) the person has, for all purposes, received a Gender Recognition Certificate as issued by the Registrar General. (b) the person’s gender identity, or lack thereof, is the acquired gender identity
(2) When a person has obtained overseas gender recognition —
(a) the person has, for all purposes, received a Gender Recognition Certificate as issued by the Registrar General. (b) the person’s gender identity, or lack thereof, is the acquired gender identity
(3) in this Act, an “overseas gender recognition” means gender recognition recognised in a country or territory outside of the United Kingdom, which resulted in a person’s gender identity, or lack thereof, becoming the acquired gender identity.
This bill is written by The Rt Hon. Sir CountBrandenburg GCMG KCB CT CVO CBE PC MP MLA on behalf of the Liberal Democrats and co-sponsored by The Labour Party, The People’s Movement, Democratic Reformist Front and The Conservative and Unionist Party and inspired by the draft Gender Recognition Reform (Scotland) Bill
Acts referenced:
The Gender Recognition Act 2004
The Gender Equality Act 2015
The Gender Equality Enhancement Act 2015
The Gender Recognition (Amendment) Act 2018
Section 27 of Schedule 3 of the Equality Act 2010
The Equality (Amendment) Act 2020
Please vote Aye/No/Abstain only.
This division shall end on Friday 17th July at 10PM BST
submitted by CountBrandenburg to MHOCMP [link] [comments]

B1048 - Gender Recognition (Reform) Bill - Final Division

Amendment 1, in the name of the Earl of Avon, is not agreed to.
Division! Clear the bar.

Gender Recognition (Reform) Bill

A
Bill
To
Reform the grounds and procedure in order to obtain gender recognition; and for connected purposes
BE IT ENACTED by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-
1 - Definitions:
The “2004 Act” refers to the Gender Recognition Act 2004.
The “2015 Acts” refers to the Gender Equality Act 2015 and the Gender Equality Enhancement Act 2015
2 - Amendments to the 2004 Act
(1)The following provisions of the 2004 Act are repealed—
(5) Where gender markings are required to denote gender identity in all official documentation including but not limited to Passports, Driving Licenses and correspondence from Government Departments, a non binary person shall be afforded the option to denote their legal gender identity an ‘x’, or as ‘non-binary’
and consequently the definitions of “Gender Dysphoria” and “approved country or territory” under Section 25 are repealed
(2) The following sections in the 2004 Act are amended—
and subsequently add “identity” after “acquired gender” in Section 10 (5) and Section 25
(2) “Protected Information” means information that relates to a person: (a) who has made an application for a gender recognition certificate and which concerns that application or any other application by that person under this Act. (b) whose gender identity, or lack thereof, has become the acquired gender identity and concerns the gender identity before it became the acquired gender identity.
(3) Insert a new section into the 2004 Act, reading:
2A - Applications to the Registrar General Schedule 3A (Applications to the Registrar General) has effect .
And Schedule 3A shall be implemented as per the schedule of this Act.
3 - Amendments to the 2015 Acts
Section 2 in the Gender Equality Act 2015 is repealed in its entirety, and consequently Section 2 of the Gender Equality Enhancement Act 2015 is repealed.
4 - Amendments to the Equality Act 2010
In Section 27 of Schedule 3, replace—
And insert subsection (9) reading, “A person using a service should be under no obligation to disclose their gender identity or be excluded from using a service based on their perceived gender identity, or lack thereof”
And insert subsection (a) after (9) reading, “any exclusion based on perceived gender identity, or lack thereof, or based on a person’s gender which has ceased to be the same as their acquired gender, shall be treated as discrimination based on gender identity.”
And rename the cross heading “Single Sex Spaces” to “Same Gender Identity Spaces”
5 - Extent, Commencement and Short Title
(1)This Section and Section 4 extends to England and Wales, and Scotland
(2) Section 1, Section 2, Section 3 and consequently the Schedule of this Act extends to England and Wales only.
(3)This Act comes into force 6 months after Royal Assent.
(4) This Act may be cited as the Gender Recognition (Reform) Act 2020.
#Schedule
Insert in the 2004 Act:
Schedule 3A - Applications to the Registrar General
1 - Interpretations
In this section, “Registrar General” shall refer to the Registrar General for England & Wales.
2 - Persons who may apply to the Registrar General for Gender Recognition
(1)A person making an application under Section 1 (1) of this Act may do so if they meet the condition that:
(a) is a subject of a UK birth registry entry or; (b) is not the subject of such an entry, but is an ordinary resident in England or Wales.
3 - Notice to be given by Registrar General upon receipt of application
(1)On receipt of an application under Section 1 (1) of this Act, the Registrar General must notify the applicant in writing, including electronic form: —
(a) that the application has been received (b) the date by which a Gender Recognition Certificate will be provided. (c)that the applicant has the right to revoke the Gender Recognition Certificate during the intermission period and is not limited to applying for a Gender Recognition Certificate again after this period. (d)reiterate that there is no cost for applying for a Gender Recognition Certificate in this instance or in future instances of application.
4 - Ground for which application is granted
(1)The Registrar General must grant application under section 1 (1) of this Act if—
(a) the application includes a statutory declaration by the applicant that the applicant meets the criteria of: (i) Section 1 of this Act (ii) Section 2 of this Schedule
(2) A statutory declaration shall be the only requirement by the Registrar General to process an application for a Gender Recognition Certificate
(a) An applicant may declare they intend to live in their acquired gender permanently but the absence of this must have no bearing on the processing of a Gender Recognition Certificate. (b) there shall be no charge for requesting a Gender Recognition Certificate at any instance of any application by an applicant.
(3)An application for a Gender Recognition Certificate is considered revoked if the applicant sends written notice stating their wish for the application to not continue before the day that a Gender Recognition Certificate is issued
5 - Certificate to be issued by the Registrar General
(1)The Registrar General must issue a Full Gender Recognition Certificate to an applicant by the date given under Section 3 (1) of this Schedule.
(2) If there is a delay in the issuing of the Gender Recognition Certificate, the Registrar General must inform the applicant, in writing, the reasons for such a delay.
(3) If there is an error in print, an applicant may, in writing, inform the Registrar General.
(a) The Registrar General must inform the applicant when the error will be fixed by, and issue a replacement Gender Recognition Certificate.
6 - Gender Recognition obtained outside of England & Wales
(1)When a person has obtained a Gender Recognition Certificate in Scotland or Northern Ireland, —
(a) the person has, for all purposes, received a Gender Recognition Certificate as issued by the Registrar General. (b) the person’s gender identity, or lack thereof, is the acquired gender identity
(2) When a person has obtained overseas gender recognition —
(a) the person has, for all purposes, received a Gender Recognition Certificate as issued by the Registrar General. (b) the person’s gender identity, or lack thereof, is the acquired gender identity
(3) in this Act, an “overseas gender recognition” means gender recognition recognised in a country or territory outside of the United Kingdom, which resulted in a person’s gender identity, or lack thereof, becoming the acquired gender identity.
This bill is written by The Rt Hon. Sir CountBrandenburg GCMG KCB CT CVO CBE PC MP MLA on behalf of the Liberal Democrats and co-sponsored by The Labour Party, The People’s Movement, Democratic Reformist Front and The Conservative and Unionist Party and inspired by the draft Gender Recognition Reform (Scotland) Bill
Acts referenced:
The Gender Recognition Act 2004
The Gender Equality Act 2015
The Gender Equality Enhancement Act 2015
The Gender Recognition (Amendment) Act 2018
Section 27 of Schedule 3 of the Equality Act 2010
The Equality (Amendment) Act 2020
This division ends 1 August 2020 at 10pm BST.
Please vote Content, Not Content, or Present only.
submitted by lily-irl to MHOLVote [link] [comments]

B1048 - Gender Recognition (Reform) Bill | 2nd Reading

Order, order!

Gender Recognition (Reform) Bill

A
Bill
To
Reform the grounds and procedure in order to obtain gender recognition; and for connected purposes
BE IT ENACTED by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-
1 - Definitions:
The “2004 Act” refers to the Gender Recognition Act 2004.
The “2015 Acts” refers to the Gender Equality Act 2015 and the Gender Equality Enhancement Act 2015
2 - Amendments to the 2004 Act
(1)The following provisions of the 2004 Act are repealed—
(5) Where gender markings are required to denote gender identity in all official documentation including but not limited to Passports, Driving Licenses and correspondence from Government Departments, a non binary person shall be afforded the option to denote their legal gender identity an ‘x’, or as ‘non-binary’
and consequently the definitions of “Gender Dysphoria” and “approved country or territory” under Section 25 are repealed
(2) The following sections in the 2004 Act are amended—
and subsequently add “identity” after “acquired gender” in Section 10 (5) and Section 25
(2) “Protected Information” means information that relates to a person:
(a) who has made an application for a gender recognition certificate and which concerns that application or any other application by that person under this Act.
(b) whose gender identity, or lack thereof, has become the acquired gender identity and concerns the gender identity before it became the acquired gender identity.
(3) Insert a new section into the 2004 Act, reading:
2A - Applications to the Registrar General
Schedule 3A (Applications to the Registrar General) has effect .
And Schedule 3A shall be implemented as per the schedule of this Act.
3 - Amendments to the 2015 Acts
Section 2 in the Gender Equality Act 2015 is repealed in its entirety, and consequently Section 2 of the Gender Equality Enhancement Act 2015 is repealed.
4 - Amendments to the Equality Act 2010
In Section 27 of Schedule 3, replace—
And insert subsection (9) reading, “A person using a service should be under no obligation to disclose their gender identity or be excluded from using a service based on their perceived gender identity, or lack thereof”
And insert subsection (a) after (9) reading, “any exclusion based on perceived gender identity, or lack thereof, or based on a person’s gender which has ceased to be the same as their acquired gender, shall be treated as discrimination based on gender identity.”
And rename the cross heading “Single Sex Spaces” to “Same Gender Identity Spaces”
5 - Extent, Commencement and Short Title
(1)This Section and Section 4 extends to England and Wales, and Scotland
(2) Section 1, Section 2, Section 3 and consequently the Schedule of this Act extends to England and Wales only.
(3)This Act comes into force 6 months after Royal Assent.
(4) This Act may be cited as the Gender Recognition (Reform) Act 2020.
#Schedule
Insert in the 2004 Act:
Schedule 3A - Applications to the Registrar General
1 - Interpretations
In this section, “Registrar General” shall refer to the Registrar General for England & Wales.
2 - Persons who may apply to the Registrar General for Gender Recognition
(1)A person making an application under Section 1 (1) of this Act may do so if they meet the condition that:
(a) is a subject of a UK birth registry entry or;
(b) is not the subject of such an entry, but is an ordinary resident in England or Wales.
3 - Notice to be given by Registrar General upon receipt of application
(1)On receipt of an application under Section 1 (1) of this Act, the Registrar General must notify the applicant in writing, including electronic form: —
(a) that the application has been received
(b) the date by which a Gender Recognition Certificate will be provided.
(c)that the applicant has the right to revoke the Gender Recognition Certificate during the intermission period and is not limited to applying for a Gender Recognition Certificate again after this period.
(d)reiterate that there is no cost for applying for a Gender Recognition Certificate in this instance or in future instances of application.
4 - Ground for which application is granted
(1)The Registrar General must grant application under section 1 (1) of this Act if—
(a) the application includes a statutory declaration by the applicant that the applicant meets the criteria of:
(i) Section 1 of this Act
(ii) Section 2 of this Schedule
(2) A statutory declaration shall be the only requirement by the Registrar General to process an application for a Gender Recognition Certificate
(a) An applicant may declare they intend to live in their acquired gender permanently but the absence of this must have no bearing on the processing of a Gender Recognition Certificate.
(b) there shall be no charge for requesting a Gender Recognition Certificate at any instance of any application by an applicant.
(3)An application for a Gender Recognition Certificate is considered revoked if the applicant sends written notice stating their wish for the application to not continue before the day that a Gender Recognition Certificate is issued
5 - Certificate to be issued by the Registrar General
(1)The Registrar General must issue a Full Gender Recognition Certificate to an applicant by the date given under Section 3 (1) of this Schedule.
(2) If there is a delay in the issuing of the Gender Recognition Certificate, the Registrar General must inform the applicant, in writing, the reasons for such a delay.
(3) If there is an error in print, an applicant may, in writing, inform the Registrar General.
(a) The Registrar General must inform the applicant when the error will be fixed by, and issue a replacement Gender Recognition Certificate.
6 - Gender Recognition obtained outside of England & Wales
(1)When a person has obtained a Gender Recognition Certificate in Scotland or Northern Ireland, —
(a) the person has, for all purposes, received a Gender Recognition Certificate as issued by the Registrar General.
(b) the person’s gender identity, or lack thereof, is the acquired gender identity
(2) When a person has obtained overseas gender recognition —
(a) the person has, for all purposes, received a Gender Recognition Certificate as issued by the Registrar General.
(b) the person’s gender identity, or lack thereof, is the acquired gender identity
(3) in this Act, an “overseas gender recognition” means gender recognition recognised in a country or territory outside of the United Kingdom, which resulted in a person’s gender identity, or lack thereof, becoming the acquired gender identity.
**This bill is written by The Rt Hon. Sir CountBrandenburg GCMG KCB CT CVO CBE PC MP MLA on behalf of the Liberal Democrats and co-sponsored by The Labour Party, The People’s Movement, Democratic Reformist Front and The Conservative and Unionist Party and inspired by the draft Gender Recognition Reform (Scotland) Bill*
Acts referenced:
The Gender Recognition Act 2004
The Gender Equality Act 2015
The Gender Equality Enhancement Act 2015
The Gender Recognition (Amendment) Act 2018
Section 27 of Schedule 3 of the Equality Act 2010
The Equality (Amendment) Act 2020
Opening Speech:
Mr Deputy Speaker,
Section 2 (1) removes references to the Gender Recognition Panel, and obsolete references to marriage, as well as fees and the implied effects to benefits. Also omitted are various definitions such as Gender Dysphoria in order to demedicalise Gender Recognition (since applications to Gender Recognition Panels can be intrusive and undermine the idea that Gender Dysphoria is not a prerequisite to being trans) This is the same reason Section 2 of the Gender Equality Act 2015 is being repealed, since to be issued a full gender recognition certificate, there is a requirement for a professional to sign off for it rather than self declaration by an applicant.
Section 2 (2) makes amendments to the 2004 act (M:along the lines of the Draft Scotland Bill from irl and amendments to Section 22 have been altered to reflect that we recognise non binary already.)
Section 3 reflects that thanks to the Chancellor’s bill last term, we have added gender identity to the equality act over “sex” and thus adjustments have been made to the chapter on single sex spaces to reflect gender identity and ensure that trans people cannot be denied access to relevant spaces in law, as has been practice in, for example, women’s hostels to be trans inclusive previously. This act provides an opportunity to clarify this part and ensure that denial of access to these services based on perceived gender identity is discrimination based on gender identity.
Section 4 amends Section 27 of Schedule 3 of the Equality Act 2010, since references for sex discrimination have already been replaced under the Equality (Amendment) Act 2020. This changes wording to refer to gender identity and ensures that people who are trans, or otherwise of a perceived gender identity, have access to these spaces and cannot be excluded.
The Schedule, as introduced under Section 2 (3), gives the new process for applying for a Gender Recognition Certificate, guaranteeing no fees may be levied, and that the only required part is a Statutory Declaration by an applicant. There is no reflection period as this would be an antithesis for self declaration and gives the only time frame as that is required to issue the certificate. There is a right to apply as many times and that someone in the period between application and issuing may revoke their application. It recognises gender recognition that occurs outside the UK and eliminates the need to reapply if you are a non citizen resident, as well
Mr Deputy Speaker,
I believe this to be an important bill for improving our attitude to equalities. Yes, the Gender Recognition Act 2004 was a landmark piece of legislation and a victory for recognition of trans people, but reform is sorely needed and previous attempts at reforms have only tinkered with the edges. Communists and the Radical Socialist Party tinkered with the requirements under the 2015 acts and relaxed the process so that any age can receive a GRC, and removed the 2 year period for evidence upon application. That I recognise as a major step, and the advances under the Greens’ 2018 amendment under the GRA to include non binary identities, rather than the “other” status as found in the 2015 acts is another major step in reform as we are now recognising that gender exists as a spectrum and that the axioms of the binary are not fit for our modern understanding of one’s gender.
However, these acts upheld the burdensome gender recognition panel requirements, requiring someone to be going through transition or for it to be professionally certified. As we now better understand gender, Dysphoria is not a prerequisite for someone to be trans and requiring a professional diagnosis means that it makes legal recognition of a person’s gender a hurdle. That is ultimately where acts gone by have fallen short, where trans people may not experience Dysphoria or may, for whatever reason, not want to medically transition. That right for recognition must be upheld, and we only need to look to Ireland to see example of recognition in a demedicalised process in its Gender Recognition Act 2015. That is what this bill today achieves: the principle of self identification, and that the only legal requirement for someone to receive a GRC is for them to make a Statutory Declaration, a process we already use for changing information on other government identification documents.
This bill only amends Gender Recognition for England and Wales, the reforms for Scotland and Northern Ireland should seek to produce their own legislation on this matter as pertaining to the Registrar General for their respective nations, and take into account any differences in equalities law. This is my reasoning in drafting today’s bill to extend only for England and Wales.
With the nature of this bill, I have sought cross party sponsorship of this bill to signify that this House does stand with the trans community and that we reaffirm that trans rights are universal. I thank the parties who have co-sponsored and for giving me feedback on this bill’s drafting, and this strengthens the nature of it being reforms that transcends party lines. I hope to see members from all backgrounds in this House join me in passing this legislation!
  • CountBrandenburg.
This reading ends at 10pm on 13 July 2020.
submitted by Vitiating to MHOC [link] [comments]

B1048 - Gender Recognition (Reform) Bill - Amendment Division

Gender Recognition (Reform) Bill

A
Bill
To
Reform the grounds and procedure in order to obtain gender recognition; and for connected purposes
BE IT ENACTED by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-
1 - Definitions:
The “2004 Act” refers to the Gender Recognition Act 2004.
The “2015 Acts” refers to the Gender Equality Act 2015 and the Gender Equality Enhancement Act 2015
2 - Amendments to the 2004 Act
(1)The following provisions of the 2004 Act are repealed—
(5) Where gender markings are required to denote gender identity in all official documentation including but not limited to Passports, Driving Licenses and correspondence from Government Departments, a non binary person shall be afforded the option to denote their legal gender identity an ‘x’, or as ‘non-binary’
and consequently the definitions of “Gender Dysphoria” and “approved country or territory” under Section 25 are repealed
(2) The following sections in the 2004 Act are amended—
and subsequently add “identity” after “acquired gender” in Section 10 (5) and Section 25
(2) “Protected Information” means information that relates to a person: (a) who has made an application for a gender recognition certificate and which concerns that application or any other application by that person under this Act. (b) whose gender identity, or lack thereof, has become the acquired gender identity and concerns the gender identity before it became the acquired gender identity.
(3) Insert a new section into the 2004 Act, reading:
2A - Applications to the Registrar General Schedule 3A (Applications to the Registrar General) has effect .
And Schedule 3A shall be implemented as per the schedule of this Act.
3 - Amendments to the 2015 Acts
Section 2 in the Gender Equality Act 2015 is repealed in its entirety, and consequently Section 2 of the Gender Equality Enhancement Act 2015 is repealed.
4 - Amendments to the Equality Act 2010
In Section 27 of Schedule 3, replace—
And insert subsection (9) reading, “A person using a service should be under no obligation to disclose their gender identity or be excluded from using a service based on their perceived gender identity, or lack thereof”
And insert subsection (a) after (9) reading, “any exclusion based on perceived gender identity, or lack thereof, or based on a person’s gender which has ceased to be the same as their acquired gender, shall be treated as discrimination based on gender identity.”
And rename the cross heading “Single Sex Spaces” to “Same Gender Identity Spaces”
5 - Extent, Commencement and Short Title
(1)This Section and Section 4 extends to England and Wales, and Scotland
(2) Section 1, Section 2, Section 3 and consequently the Schedule of this Act extends to England and Wales only.
(3)This Act comes into force 6 months after Royal Assent.
(4) This Act may be cited as the Gender Recognition (Reform) Act 2020.
#Schedule
Insert in the 2004 Act:
Schedule 3A - Applications to the Registrar General
1 - Interpretations
In this section, “Registrar General” shall refer to the Registrar General for England & Wales.
2 - Persons who may apply to the Registrar General for Gender Recognition
(1)A person making an application under Section 1 (1) of this Act may do so if they meet the condition that:
(a) is a subject of a UK birth registry entry or; (b) is not the subject of such an entry, but is an ordinary resident in England or Wales.
3 - Notice to be given by Registrar General upon receipt of application
(1)On receipt of an application under Section 1 (1) of this Act, the Registrar General must notify the applicant in writing, including electronic form: —
(a) that the application has been received (b) the date by which a Gender Recognition Certificate will be provided. (c)that the applicant has the right to revoke the Gender Recognition Certificate during the intermission period and is not limited to applying for a Gender Recognition Certificate again after this period. (d)reiterate that there is no cost for applying for a Gender Recognition Certificate in this instance or in future instances of application.
4 - Ground for which application is granted
(1)The Registrar General must grant application under section 1 (1) of this Act if—
(a) the application includes a statutory declaration by the applicant that the applicant meets the criteria of: (i) Section 1 of this Act (ii) Section 2 of this Schedule
(2) A statutory declaration shall be the only requirement by the Registrar General to process an application for a Gender Recognition Certificate
(a) An applicant may declare they intend to live in their acquired gender permanently but the absence of this must have no bearing on the processing of a Gender Recognition Certificate. (b) there shall be no charge for requesting a Gender Recognition Certificate at any instance of any application by an applicant.
(3)An application for a Gender Recognition Certificate is considered revoked if the applicant sends written notice stating their wish for the application to not continue before the day that a Gender Recognition Certificate is issued
5 - Certificate to be issued by the Registrar General
(1)The Registrar General must issue a Full Gender Recognition Certificate to an applicant by the date given under Section 3 (1) of this Schedule.
(2) If there is a delay in the issuing of the Gender Recognition Certificate, the Registrar General must inform the applicant, in writing, the reasons for such a delay.
(3) If there is an error in print, an applicant may, in writing, inform the Registrar General.
(a) The Registrar General must inform the applicant when the error will be fixed by, and issue a replacement Gender Recognition Certificate.
6 - Gender Recognition obtained outside of England & Wales
(1)When a person has obtained a Gender Recognition Certificate in Scotland or Northern Ireland, —
(a) the person has, for all purposes, received a Gender Recognition Certificate as issued by the Registrar General. (b) the person’s gender identity, or lack thereof, is the acquired gender identity
(2) When a person has obtained overseas gender recognition —
(a) the person has, for all purposes, received a Gender Recognition Certificate as issued by the Registrar General. (b) the person’s gender identity, or lack thereof, is the acquired gender identity
(3) in this Act, an “overseas gender recognition” means gender recognition recognised in a country or territory outside of the United Kingdom, which resulted in a person’s gender identity, or lack thereof, becoming the acquired gender identity.
This bill is written by The Rt Hon. Sir CountBrandenburg GCMG KCB CT CVO CBE PC MP MLA on behalf of the Liberal Democrats and co-sponsored by The Labour Party, The People’s Movement, Democratic Reformist Front and The Conservative and Unionist Party and inspired by the draft Gender Recognition Reform (Scotland) Bill
Acts referenced:
The Gender Recognition Act 2004
The Gender Equality Act 2015
The Gender Equality Enhancement Act 2015
The Gender Recognition (Amendment) Act 2018
Section 27 of Schedule 3 of the Equality Act 2010
The Equality (Amendment) Act 2020
Amendment 1, in the name of the Rt Hon. the Earl of Avon
remove from 2 - Amendments to the 2004 Act the following text;
"Section 2, except for (5) as amended —
(5) Where gender markings are required to denote gender identity in all official documentation including but not limited to Passports, Driving Licenses and correspondence from Government Departments, a non binary person shall be afforded the option to denote their legal gender identity an ‘x’, or as ‘non-binary’"
My Lords,
while the UK offers gender non confirming individuals the ability to place an "x" on any gender identity for internal UK use, it has so far resisted doing so for passports in order to keep them in line with the intentional standards for the content of a passport.
This was supported by the Court case R (Christie Elan-Cane) v Secretary of State for the Home Department
That not issuing such documents is not discriminatory on the part of the Home Office. The case rejected a claim that such a policy voided Article 8 ECHR was rejected in part due to the fact the government in this current age was reviewing what documentation for gender non conforming individuals required.
My Lords,
As part of this consultation the Passport office, it's self-put out a warning based on the experience of those in Australia with an "x" marker on the effect of outing Oneself to the authorities of less accepting countries, the implications of a British subject not having there passport recognised and thus not being facilitated the rights that One can normally expect abroad or worse facing expressed prosecution because of information in One's passport is something this house should consider.
It is for these reasons and not any other I wish for this chamber to debate in the next reading the inclusion of the aforementioned section in this Bill.
This division ends 30 July 2020 at 10pm BST.
Please vote Content, Not Content, or Present to Amendment 1.
submitted by lily-irl to MHOLVote [link] [comments]

B1048 - Gender Recognition (Reform) Bill - Amendment Reading

Gender Recognition (Reform) Bill

A
Bill
To
Reform the grounds and procedure in order to obtain gender recognition; and for connected purposes
BE IT ENACTED by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-
1 - Definitions:
The “2004 Act” refers to the Gender Recognition Act 2004.
The “2015 Acts” refers to the Gender Equality Act 2015 and the Gender Equality Enhancement Act 2015
2 - Amendments to the 2004 Act
(1)The following provisions of the 2004 Act are repealed—
(5) Where gender markings are required to denote gender identity in all official documentation including but not limited to Passports, Driving Licenses and correspondence from Government Departments, a non binary person shall be afforded the option to denote their legal gender identity an ‘x’, or as ‘non-binary’
and consequently the definitions of “Gender Dysphoria” and “approved country or territory” under Section 25 are repealed
(2) The following sections in the 2004 Act are amended—
and subsequently add “identity” after “acquired gender” in Section 10 (5) and Section 25
(2) “Protected Information” means information that relates to a person: (a) who has made an application for a gender recognition certificate and which concerns that application or any other application by that person under this Act. (b) whose gender identity, or lack thereof, has become the acquired gender identity and concerns the gender identity before it became the acquired gender identity.
(3) Insert a new section into the 2004 Act, reading:
2A - Applications to the Registrar General Schedule 3A (Applications to the Registrar General) has effect .
And Schedule 3A shall be implemented as per the schedule of this Act.
3 - Amendments to the 2015 Acts
Section 2 in the Gender Equality Act 2015 is repealed in its entirety, and consequently Section 2 of the Gender Equality Enhancement Act 2015 is repealed.
4 - Amendments to the Equality Act 2010
In Section 27 of Schedule 3, replace—
And insert subsection (9) reading, “A person using a service should be under no obligation to disclose their gender identity or be excluded from using a service based on their perceived gender identity, or lack thereof”
And insert subsection (a) after (9) reading, “any exclusion based on perceived gender identity, or lack thereof, or based on a person’s gender which has ceased to be the same as their acquired gender, shall be treated as discrimination based on gender identity.”
And rename the cross heading “Single Sex Spaces” to “Same Gender Identity Spaces”
5 - Extent, Commencement and Short Title
(1)This Section and Section 4 extends to England and Wales, and Scotland
(2) Section 1, Section 2, Section 3 and consequently the Schedule of this Act extends to England and Wales only.
(3)This Act comes into force 6 months after Royal Assent.
(4) This Act may be cited as the Gender Recognition (Reform) Act 2020.
#Schedule
Insert in the 2004 Act:
Schedule 3A - Applications to the Registrar General
1 - Interpretations
In this section, “Registrar General” shall refer to the Registrar General for England & Wales.
2 - Persons who may apply to the Registrar General for Gender Recognition
(1)A person making an application under Section 1 (1) of this Act may do so if they meet the condition that:
(a) is a subject of a UK birth registry entry or; (b) is not the subject of such an entry, but is an ordinary resident in England or Wales.
3 - Notice to be given by Registrar General upon receipt of application
(1)On receipt of an application under Section 1 (1) of this Act, the Registrar General must notify the applicant in writing, including electronic form: —
(a) that the application has been received (b) the date by which a Gender Recognition Certificate will be provided. (c)that the applicant has the right to revoke the Gender Recognition Certificate during the intermission period and is not limited to applying for a Gender Recognition Certificate again after this period. (d)reiterate that there is no cost for applying for a Gender Recognition Certificate in this instance or in future instances of application.
4 - Ground for which application is granted
(1)The Registrar General must grant application under section 1 (1) of this Act if—
(a) the application includes a statutory declaration by the applicant that the applicant meets the criteria of: (i) Section 1 of this Act (ii) Section 2 of this Schedule
(2) A statutory declaration shall be the only requirement by the Registrar General to process an application for a Gender Recognition Certificate
(a) An applicant may declare they intend to live in their acquired gender permanently but the absence of this must have no bearing on the processing of a Gender Recognition Certificate. (b) there shall be no charge for requesting a Gender Recognition Certificate at any instance of any application by an applicant.
(3)An application for a Gender Recognition Certificate is considered revoked if the applicant sends written notice stating their wish for the application to not continue before the day that a Gender Recognition Certificate is issued
5 - Certificate to be issued by the Registrar General
(1)The Registrar General must issue a Full Gender Recognition Certificate to an applicant by the date given under Section 3 (1) of this Schedule.
(2) If there is a delay in the issuing of the Gender Recognition Certificate, the Registrar General must inform the applicant, in writing, the reasons for such a delay.
(3) If there is an error in print, an applicant may, in writing, inform the Registrar General.
(a) The Registrar General must inform the applicant when the error will be fixed by, and issue a replacement Gender Recognition Certificate.
6 - Gender Recognition obtained outside of England & Wales
(1)When a person has obtained a Gender Recognition Certificate in Scotland or Northern Ireland, —
(a) the person has, for all purposes, received a Gender Recognition Certificate as issued by the Registrar General. (b) the person’s gender identity, or lack thereof, is the acquired gender identity
(2) When a person has obtained overseas gender recognition —
(a) the person has, for all purposes, received a Gender Recognition Certificate as issued by the Registrar General. (b) the person’s gender identity, or lack thereof, is the acquired gender identity
(3) in this Act, an “overseas gender recognition” means gender recognition recognised in a country or territory outside of the United Kingdom, which resulted in a person’s gender identity, or lack thereof, becoming the acquired gender identity.
This bill is written by The Rt Hon. Sir CountBrandenburg GCMG KCB CT CVO CBE PC MP MLA on behalf of the Liberal Democrats and co-sponsored by The Labour Party, The People’s Movement, Democratic Reformist Front and The Conservative and Unionist Party and inspired by the draft Gender Recognition Reform (Scotland) Bill
Acts referenced:
The Gender Recognition Act 2004
The Gender Equality Act 2015
The Gender Equality Enhancement Act 2015
The Gender Recognition (Amendment) Act 2018
Section 27 of Schedule 3 of the Equality Act 2010
The Equality (Amendment) Act 2020
Amendment 1, in the name of the Rt Hon. the Earl of Avon
remove from 2 - Amendments to the 2004 Act the following text;
"Section 2, except for (5) as amended —
(5) Where gender markings are required to denote gender identity in all official documentation including but not limited to Passports, Driving Licenses and correspondence from Government Departments, a non binary person shall be afforded the option to denote their legal gender identity an ‘x’, or as ‘non-binary’"
My Lords,
while the UK offers gender non confirming individuals the ability to place an "x" on any gender identity for internal UK use, it has so far resisted doing so for passports in order to keep them in line with the intentional standards for the content of a passport.
This was supported by the Court case R (Christie Elan-Cane) v Secretary of State for the Home Department
That not issuing such documents is not discriminatory on the part of the Home Office. The case rejected a claim that such a policy voided Article 8 ECHR was rejected in part due to the fact the government in this current age was reviewing what documentation for gender non conforming individuals required.
My Lords,
As part of this consultation the Passport office, it's self-put out a warning based on the experience of those in Australia with an "x" marker on the effect of outing Oneself to the authorities of less accepting countries, the implications of a British subject not having there passport recognised and thus not being facilitated the rights that One can normally expect abroad or worse facing expressed prosecution because of information in One's passport is something this house should consider.
It is for these reasons and not any other I wish for this chamber to debate in the next reading the inclusion of the aforementioned section in this Bill.
This debate ends 28 July 2020 at 10pm BST.
submitted by lily-irl to MHOL [link] [comments]

what is this i just downloaded (youtube code?)

so this is kinda a wierd story. I was planning to restart my computer. (cant remember why) I spend most of my time watching youtube videos so i had alot of tabs open. So i was watching the videos then deleting the tab but not opening new tabs. So i was down 2 i think 1 it was a pretty long video so i tried to open a youtube home page tab just to look while i listened to the video. And this is a short exerp of what i got.





YouTube











submitted by inhuman7773 to techsupport [link] [comments]

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BINARY OPTIONS UK - YouTube

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